Information

3.4: Program results - Biology


Here is what the program produces, shortened to fit on a page of this book.

1

2

4

8

16

32

:

6.64614 × 1035

1.32923 × 1036

If you run this program in R or another suitable language, you should see something essentially identical to the above. Between Monday and Friday, 120 bacterial doublings would produce over 1036 bacteria—that’s 1 followed by 36 zeros. That is the computational result. The scientific question is how many individuals this amounts to. Worked out exactly, it is this number: 2120 = 1,329,227,995,784,915,872,903,807,060,280,344,576. To understand the size of this number, suppose the bacteria are roughly cubical 1 µm on a side—one millionth of a meter, or about four hundred-thousandths of an inch (a suitable order-of-magnitude for a bacterium). What volume will the colony occupy in cubic meters at the end of the work week, after five full days of growing unchecked? You might want to speculate: will it fill the culture plate, overflow onto the lab bench, fill the lab, or what?

Work it out and you will see that the answer is 2120 bacteria times 10-18 cubic meters per bacterium equals about 1.3 × 1018 cubic meters total. How large is that? Estimate the ocean to be a film averaging 3.7 kilometers deep and coating two-thirds of a sphere with a 6400 kilometer radius (this approximates the amount of the earth’s surface that is covered by ocean). This is about 1.3 × 1018 cubic meters! At the end of five days, the colony unchecked would thus fill all oceans of the earth with a dense microbial mass, from the greatest depths up to the surface!

This result has deep-reaching implications. First, even though this bacterial model can be quite accurate for a day or so, it fails completely over the course of a week. All models are approximations to reality, at best applicable over a suitable range. Second, there are lessons in its failure. It illustrates one of the inviolable laws of biology—that no population growth can remain unlimited for long. And third, in a mind like Charles Darwin’s, and coupled with other biological principles, it leads to the conclusion that organisms must evolve. That is the story of Darwin’s elephants.


BS in Biology

Loyola's Bachelor of Science (BS) in Biology degree program offers a myriad of undergraduate student research opportunities. The program's reputation also has enabled students to secure internships in hospitals, at medical equipment companies, zoos, biotech companies and many other employers.

At the completion of the Undergraduate Biology Major:

  1. Students will be able to answer knowledge and comprehension type questions (Bloom’s taxonomy level 1 and 2) related to fundamental biologic concepts and learn basic facts and terminology in the various subfields of biology.
  2. Students will be proficient in the use of standard laboratory equipment.
  3. Students will be able to retrieve, synthesize, and critically evaluate scientific literature.
  4. Students will be able to communicate (orally and in writing) results and interpretation of scientific research.
  5. Students will be able to design and implement experiments that test predictive hypotheses, analyze data, report results, and interpret the significance of these experiments.

Loyola students recommended for admission by the Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee have nearly an 75% acceptance rate into health professional schools, which is nearly double the national average of 47%. This also attests to the caliber of Loyola's Biology program.

  • Biology Research Fellows Program
  • Biology Summer Research Fellowships
  • Mulcahy Scholars Program

Biology Courses: Required

  • BIOL 101 General Biology I (3)
  • BIOL 111 General Biology I Lab (1)
  • BIOL 102 General Biology II (3)
  • BIOL 112 General Biology II Lab (1)
  • BIOL 251 Cell Biology (3)
  • BIOL 265 Ecology (3)
  • BIOL 282 Genetics (3)

ONE lab course from the following:

Biology Courses: Electives

Effective with the fall 2010 semester, students must take at least nine (9) credits of Biology at the 300-level in order to graduate with a BS in Biology

Two elective courses must include a laboratory component. For a listing of available Biology Electives, click here.

Biology Laboratory: Requirements

A minimum of 5 labs are required for the BS in Biology. For a listing of the lab requirements, click here.

Chemistry

  • CHEM 101 General Chemistry A (3) *
  • CHEM 111 General Chemistry Lab A (1)
  • CHEM 102 General Chemistry B (3) *
  • CHEM 112 General Chemistry Lab B (1)
  • CHEM 223 Organic Chemistry A (3) **
  • CHEM 225 Organic Chemistry Lab A (1)
  • CHEM 224 Organic Chemistry B (3) **
  • CHEM 226 Organic Chemistry Lab B (1)

*OR CHEM 105, CHEM 106
** OR CHEM 221, CHEM 222

Mathematics

Physics

  • PHYS 111 Physics I (PHYS 111K or PHYS 125 may be substituted) (3/3/4)
  • PHYS 111L Physics Lab I (1)
  • PHYS 112 Physics II (PHYS 112K or PHYS 126 may be substituted)(3/3/3)
  • PHYS 112L Physics Lab II (1)

Cancer Cell Research

Undergraduate biology students Maggie Xie 󈧘, Isabelle Seppa 󈧘, Brenna McAllister 󈧙, and Giulia Crosio 󈥴 spent summer break conducting a variety of innovative cancer cell research in Dr. Shelley Phelan’s biology lab.

Their potentially groundbreaking studies included discovering new ways to detect cancer cell aggressiveness using natural fluorescents, determining the ability to grow breast cancer cells on 3D printed polylactic acid scaffolds, and analyzing the effects of olive leaf chemical compounds on the death of leukemia cancer cells.

Watch Video

Algal Blooms


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Bachelor of Science students must select a single track. Each track includes at least eight courses. The experiential elective requirement may be satisfied by taking an appropriate investigative lab for the track, or through several other options: students who use BIOL:4999 Honors Investigations to fulfill the experiential elective requirement must complete a minimum of 6 s.h. in that course students who use BIOL:3994 Introduction to Research must complete a minimum of 5 s.h. in that course in combination with 1 s.h. in BIOL:4898 Communicating Research and students who use BIOL:4897 Teaching Internship in Biology or BIOL:4806 Service Learning in Biology must complete a minimum of 4 s.h. in those courses.

Additionally, students may satisfy the experiential elective requirement by completing at least 4 s.h. in two different courses from a combination of these courses: BIOL:3994 Introduction to Research , BIOL:4213 Bioinformatics , BIOL:4897 Teaching Internship in Biology , BIOL:4999 Honors Research in Biology , LATH:3001 Latham Fellows: Science Outreach Project , and an approved biology-related internship.

Cell and Developmental Biology Track

The cell and developmental biology track provides education in the structure and function of cells and in the principles of development as they apply to animals and plants. This track is appropriate for students who wish to pursue graduate study in cellular and developmental biology, to prepare for professional study in medicine and other health-related fields, or to take positions in laboratories and companies engaged in cancer research and related fields.

Track Courses

Course List
Code Title Hours
Two of these:
BIOL:3172Evolution4
BIOL:3233Introduction to Developmental Biology3
BIOL:3363Plant Developmental Biology3
One of these:
BIOL:3626Cell Biology Laboratory4
BIOL:3736Developmental Biology Lab4
One of these:
BIOC:3130Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II (students who take BIOC:3120 as a chemistry/mathematics/physics foundation course must take this course)3
CHEM:2220Organic Chemistry II3
CS:2110Programming for Informatics4
MICR:2157-MICR:2158General Microbiology - General Microbiology Laboratory5

Experiential Elective

Course List
Code Title Hours
One of these 12 options:
BIOL:3626Cell Biology Laboratory4
BIOL:3655Neurogenetics Laboratory4
BIOL:3656Neurobiology Laboratory4
BIOL:3676Evolution Lab4
BIOL:3716Genetics and Biotechnology Lab4
BIOL:3736Developmental Biology Lab (if not taken as a track course)4
BIOL:3994 & BIOL:4898Introduction to Research - Communicating Research (BIOL:3994 must be taken for a total of 5 s.h.)6
BIOL:4213Bioinformatics4
BIOL:4314Introduction to Synthetic Biology in the Lab4
BIOL:4806Service Learning in Biology (taken two times for a total of 4 s.h.)4
BIOL:4897Teaching Internship in Biology (must be taken two different semesters for a total of 4 s.h.)4
BIOL:4999Honors Research in Biology6
or
A combination of at least two different courses for a total of 4 s.h. from these:
BIOL:3994Introduction to Research2-3
BIOL:4213Bioinformatics2
BIOL:4897Teaching Internship in Biology2-3
BIOL:4999Honors Research in Biologyarr.
LATH:3001Latham Fellows: Science Outreach Project2
An approved biology-related internship

Electives

Course List
Code Title Hours
At least three of these, with a minimum of one course numbered 3000 or above:
BIOL:2254Endocrinology3
BIOL:2603Mechanisms of Aging3
BIOL:2753Introduction to Neurobiology3
BIOL:3172Evolution (if not taken as a track course)4
BIOL:3233Introduction to Developmental Biology (if not taken as a track course)3
BIOL:3253Neurobiology I4
BIOL:3254Neurobiology II4
BIOL:3314Genomics3
BIOL:3343Animal Physiology3
BIOL:3363Plant Developmental Biology (if not taken as a track course)3
BIOL:3713Molecular Genetics4
BIOL:4333Genes and Development3
May include one of these:
BIOL:2663Plant Response to the Environment3
BIOL:3663Plant Response to the Environment3

Genetics and Biotechnology Track

The genetics and biotechnology track provides education in the key principles of transmission, maintenance, regulation, and manipulation of genes. This track is appropriate for students who wish to pursue graduate study in fields related to genetics or to enter the modern biotechnology industry. It also provides excellent preparation for professional study in medicine and other health-related fields.

Track Courses

Course List
Code Title Hours
All of these:
BIOL:3172Evolution4
BIOL:3314Genomics3
BIOL:3713Molecular Genetics4
BIOL:3716Genetics and Biotechnology Lab4
One of these:
BIOC:3130Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II (students who take BIOC:3120 as a chemistry/mathematics/physics foundation course must take this course)3
CHEM:2220Organic Chemistry II3
CS:2110Programming for Informatics4
MICR:2157-MICR:2158General Microbiology - General Microbiology Laboratory5

Experiential Elective

Course List
Code Title Hours
One of these 10 options:
BIOL:3626Cell Biology Laboratory4
BIOL:3655Neurogenetics Laboratory4
BIOL:3676Evolution Lab4
BIOL:3736Developmental Biology Lab4
BIOL:3994 & BIOL:4898Introduction to Research - Communicating Research (BIOL:3994 must be taken for a total of 5 s.h.)6
BIOL:4213Bioinformatics4
BIOL:4314Introduction to Synthetic Biology in the Lab4
BIOL:4806Service Learning in Biology (taken two times for a total of 4 s.h.)4
BIOL:4897Teaching Internship in Biology (must be taken two different semesters for a total of 4 s.h.)4
BIOL:4999Honors Research in Biology6
or
A combination of at least two different courses for a total of 4 s.h. from these:
BIOL:3994Introduction to Research2-3
BIOL:4213Bioinformatics2
BIOL:4897Teaching Internship in Biology2-3
BIOL:4999Honors Research in Biologyarr.
LATH:3001Latham Fellows: Science Outreach Project2
An approved biology-related internship

Electives

Course List
Code Title Hours
At least two of these, with a minimum of one course numbered 3000 or above:
BIOL:2254Endocrinology3
BIOL:2603Mechanisms of Aging3
BIOL:2673Ecology3
BIOL:2753Introduction to Neurobiology3
BIOL:3233Introduction to Developmental Biology3
BIOL:3244Animal Behavior3,5
BIOL:3253Neurobiology I4
BIOL:3343Animal Physiology3
BIOL:3363Plant Developmental Biology3
BIOL:3373Human Population Genetics and Variation3
BIOL:3383Introduction to Systems Biology3
BIOL:4333Genes and Development3
BIOL:4373Molecular Evolution: Genes, Genomes, and Organisms3
BIOL:4386Introduction to Scientific Computing for Biologists3
May include one of these:
BIOL:2663Plant Response to the Environment3
BIOL:3663Plant Response to the Environment3

Integrative Biology Track

The integrative biology track offers a diverse, well-balanced introduction to the major fields of biology. This track prepares students for graduate study in the biological sciences, in science education, and for work in laboratories that engage in research and applications in many fields of biology. It also provides broadly based preparation for professional study in medicine and other health-related fields.

Track Courses

Course List
Code Title Hours
Both of these:
BIOL:2673Ecology3
BIOL:3172Evolution4
One of these:
BIOC:3130Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II (students who take BIOC:3120 as a chemistry/mathematics/physics foundation course must take this course)3
CHEM:2220Organic Chemistry II3
CS:2110Programming for Informatics4
MICR:2157-MICR:2158General Microbiology - General Microbiology Laboratory5

Breadth Menus

Genes and Genomes
Course List
Code Title Hours
One of these:
BIOL:3314Genomics3
BIOL:3373Human Population Genetics and Variation3
BIOL:3713Molecular Genetics4
BIOL:4333Genes and Development3
BIOL:4373Molecular Evolution: Genes, Genomes, and Organisms3
BIOL:4386Introduction to Scientific Computing for Biologists3
Biological Systems
Course List
Code Title Hours
Two of these:
BIOL:2254Endocrinology3
BIOL:2603Mechanisms of Aging3
BIOL:2753Introduction to Neurobiology3
BIOL:3233Introduction to Developmental Biology3
BIOL:3244Animal Behavior3,5
BIOL:3253Neurobiology I4
BIOL:3343Animal Physiology3
BIOL:3363Plant Developmental Biology3
BIOL:3383Introduction to Systems Biology3
May include one of these:
BIOL:2663Plant Response to the Environment3
BIOL:3663Plant Response to the Environment3
Investigative Lab
Course List
Code Title Hours
One of these:
BIOL:2246Entomology Lab4
BIOL:3626Cell Biology Laboratory4
BIOL:3655Neurogenetics Laboratory4
BIOL:3656Neurobiology Laboratory4
BIOL:3676Evolution Lab4
BIOL:3716Genetics and Biotechnology Lab4
BIOL:3736Developmental Biology Lab4

Experiential Elective

Course List
Code Title Hours
One of these 12 options:
BIOL:2246Entomology Lab (if not used for investigative lab course)4
BIOL:3626Cell Biology Laboratory (if not used for investigative lab course)4
BIOL:3655Neurogenetics Laboratory (if not used for investigative lab course)4
BIOL:3656Neurobiology Laboratory (if not used for investigative lab course)4
BIOL:3676Evolution Lab (if not used for investigative lab course)4
BIOL:3716Genetics and Biotechnology Lab (if not used for investigative lab course)4
BIOL:3736Developmental Biology Lab (if not used for investigative lab course)4
BIOL:3994 & BIOL:4898Introduction to Research - Communicating Research (BIOL:3994 must be taken for a total of 5 s.h.)6
BIOL:4213Bioinformatics4
BIOL:4806Service Learning in Biology (taken two times for a total of 4 s.h.)4
BIOL:4897Teaching Internship in Biology (must be taken two different semesters for a total of 4 s.h.)4
BIOL:4999Honors Research in Biology6
An approved Iowa Lakeside Laboratory course 4
or
A combination of at least two different courses for a total of 4 s.h. from these:
BIOL:3994Introduction to Research2-3
BIOL:4213Bioinformatics2
BIOL:4897Teaching Internship in Biology2-3
BIOL:4999Honors Research in Biologyarr.
LATH:3001Latham Fellows: Science Outreach Project2
An approved biology-related internship

Neurobiology Track

The neurobiology track provides education in nervous system function at all levels, from molecular to systems biology. This track is appropriate for students who wish to pursue graduate study in neurobiology and related areas, including psychology and the social sciences to enter laboratories that study the therapeutic basis of neurological disorders or to work in pharmaceutical companies. It also provides good preparation for professional study in medicine and other health-related fields.

Track Courses

Course List
Code Title Hours
All of these:
BIOL:2753Introduction to Neurobiology3
BIOL:3244Animal Behavior5
BIOL:3253Neurobiology I4
BIOL:3254Neurobiology II4
One of these:
BIOL:3655Neurogenetics Laboratory4
BIOL:3656Neurobiology Laboratory4
One of these:
BIOC:3130Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II (students who take BIOC:3120 as a chemistry/mathematics/physics foundation course must take this course)3
CHEM:2220Organic Chemistry II3
CS:2110Programming for Informatics4
MICR:2157-MICR:2158General Microbiology - General Microbiology Laboratory5
PHYS:2703Physics III4
PHYS:3850Electronics4
PSY:3040Psychology of Learning3
PSY:3230Psychopharmacology3
PSY:3250Neuroscience of Learning and Memory3
Other courses by permission of advisor

Experiential Elective

Course List
Code Title Hours
One of these 10 options:
BIOL:3626Cell Biology Laboratory4
BIOL:3676Evolution Lab4
BIOL:3716Genetics and Biotechnology Lab4
BIOL:3736Developmental Biology Lab4
BIOL:3994 & BIOL:4898Introduction to Research - Communicating Research (BIOL:3994 must be taken for a total of 5 s.h.)6
BIOL:4213Bioinformatics4
BIOL:4314Introduction to Synthetic Biology in the Lab4
BIOL:4806Service Learning in Biology (taken two times for a total of 4 s.h.)4
BIOL:4897Teaching Internship in Biology (must be taken two different semesters for a total of 4 s.h.)4
BIOL:4999Honors Research in Biology6
or
A combination of at least two different courses for a total of 4 s.h. from these:
BIOL:3994Introduction to Research2-3
BIOL:4213Bioinformatics2
BIOL:4897Teaching Internship in Biology2-3
BIOL:4999Honors Research in Biologyarr.
LATH:3001Latham Fellows: Science Outreach Project2
An approved biology-related internship

Electives

Course List
Code Title Hours
One of these:
BIOL:2254Endocrinology3
BIOL:2603Mechanisms of Aging3
BIOL:3172Evolution4
BIOL:3233Introduction to Developmental Biology3
BIOL:3343Animal Physiology3
BIOL:3383Introduction to Systems Biology3
BIOL:4333Genes and Development3
BIOL:4353Neurophysiology: Cells and Systems3
BIOL:4386Introduction to Scientific Computing for Biologists3

Majors

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.

Commonwealth Support (CSP) Students
If you have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). More information about your student contribution amount for each course at Fees.

Student Contribution Band: 2 Unit value: 6 units

If you are a domestic graduate coursework student with a Domestic Tuition Fee (DTF) place or international student you will be required to pay course tuition fees (see below). Course tuition fees are indexed annually. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.


Welcome to the Research Scholars Program in Insect Biology!

UC Davis is a big university, with a strong focus on research. Undergraduates can easily feel like they are lost in the crowd, and rarely get close mentorship from faculty or other research staff (how can you, when your classes have hundreds of students present?). And yet, some of the most important skills for research biologists cannot be taught in big lecture halls or even in lab courses these skills, especially those linked to conducting cutting-edge research are best learned through close mentoring relationships with faculty, and through an opportunity to do research (try it, make mistakes, learn from those mistakes, and get it right the next time).

The Research Scholars Program in Insect Biology aims to provide undergraduates with a closely-mentored research experience in biology. Because insects can be used as model systems to explore virtually any area of biology (population biology behavior and ecology biodiversity and evolutionary ecology agroecology genetics and molecular biology biochemistry and physiology cell biology), faculty in the program can provide research opportunities across the full sweep of biology. The program&rsquos goal is to provide academically strong and highly motivated undergraduates with a multi-year research experience that cultivates skills that will prepare them for a career in biological research.

II. What does the program involve?

&bull The program begins with students in their 1 st and 2 nd undergraduate years. Our goal is to develop a long-term mentoring relationship for students, to extend until the completion of the undergraduate program (usually 2 to 3 years).

&bull Students will be placed in a faculty mentor&rsquos laboratory. Our goal will be to find a strong match between the student&rsquos research interests and the research focus of the mentoring faculty member&rsquos lab no placement will be made without the enthusiastic approval from both the participating student and faculty mentor. Most students will participate in regular weekly meetings of the laboratory&rsquos research staff.

&bull The time commitment for this program depends on the individual and the mentoring lab, but we've found that students that are able to spend more time in their labs generally do better and get more from the experience. Students should expect to spend at least 10 h focused on research in a typical week, though some students may choose to pursue research more intensively over the summer, and commit less time to research during the school year.

&bull During an initial academic retreat (at the beautiful Sagehen Creek Field Station in the Sierra Nevada mountains), students will be given instruction in the process of science, approaches to choosing research questions, and the core elements of experimental design.

&bull Students will be encouraged to take supporting coursework in insect biology (e.g., general entomology, insect physiology, insect ecology) to provide the most relevant foundational information for conducting research in insect biology.

&bull During their first year in the program, students will participate in a winter seminar that will teach skills for reading and understanding recent publications in insect biology though discussion and inquiry with top researchers in the field.

&bull Students in years 1-2 of their undergraduate studies will contribute as members of a collaborative research team. In years 3-4, students will transition to increasingly independent research. The program should culminate in an independent research project, with the goal of achieving publication-quality results. Students may receive either payment (undergraduate laboratory assistant) or course units for their research. We expect that for many participating students, there will be a natural transition from paid positions (when the student is contributing to a larger research effort) to course credits (when the student is pursuing his/her own independent research).

&bull Students will receive ongoing training and career guidance in conducting research, scientific writing, presentation of research results at professional scientific meetings, and all aspects of preparing applications for graduate or professional schools.


2021 Best Accredited Online Bachelor's in Biology Programs

Is your school on this list? Get the BestColleges ranking seal.

University of Florida

A public university located in Gainesville, UF Online offers an online bachelor's in biology. Available courses span 17 academic departments related to microbiology, botany, ecology, and many other biological disciplines.

Participants have a lot of freedom when choosing guided electives, selecting from options like practical plant taxonomy, climate change biology, and population genetics. As a capstone experience, learners complete a critical analysis of biological research seminar. The program takes a broad, interdisciplinary approach and prepares students for careers in areas like bioscience management, food safety, or environmental journalism.

UF is regionally accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Program Snapshot

  • Program Name: Bachelor of Arts in Biology
  • School Status: Public
  • Tuition: $130 per credit (in-state) $560 per credit (out-of-state)
  • Credit Requirements: 120 credits
  • Program Length: 4 years
  • Format: Online
  • Instruction Style: Mostly asynchronous

Admission Requirements

Contact the School

Florida International University

A public university in Miami, FIU offers a fully online bachelor's in biology program with five available concentrations: allied health bioentrepreneur health policy, environmental policy, and pre-law science communication and general biology.

No matter their concentration, participants take core courses covering topics related to ecology, genetics, and evolution. They must also complete a senior seminar class. Only students working toward their first college degree may apply to earn this online bachelor of arts in biology at FIU. Students may begin their studies at the beginning of the spring, summer, or fall semester.

FIU is regionally accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Program Snapshot

  • Program Name: Bachelor of Arts in Biology
  • School Status: Public
  • Tuition: $230 per credit (in-state) $350 per credit (out-of-state)
  • Credit Requirements: 120 credits
  • Program Length: 4 years
  • Format: Online
  • Instruction Style: Asynchronous

Admission Requirements

  • GPA: No minimum requirement
  • Standardized Tests: ACT or SAT

Contact the School

Logan University

Located in Chesterfield, Missouri, Logan focuses solely on health science-related degrees. The school offers an online bachelor of science in human biology that prepares students for a healthcare career or for graduate school. Available courses include an introduction to public health, biostatistics, and immunology. Students also complete a capstone course, choosing from options related to health science, medicine, dentistry, or allied health.

Logan also offers a Flexible Accelerated Science Track that allows students to expedite graduation, completing basic general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics courses in a single semester, instead of two semesters. New students can begin their studies at the beginning of any term.

Logan is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Program Snapshot

  • Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Human Biology
  • School Status: Private
  • Tuition: $280 per credit
  • Credit Requirements: 122 credits
  • Program Length: 3-4 years
  • Format: Online

Admission Requirements

Contact the School

Life University

A private university located in Marietta, Georgia, LIFE offers an online bachelor's in biology. The program caters to students preparing to join the workforce immediately after graduation or attend grad school. In addition to general education classes and core biology coursework, students can choose from electives like human anatomy and physiology, pathology, nutrition, and exercise science.

Common careers pursued by program graduates include medical technologist, wildlife biologist, and geoscientist. LIFE follows a quarter system and the university is regionally accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Program Snapshot

  • Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Biology
  • School Status: Private
  • Tuition: $270 per quarter credit
  • Credit Requirements: 188 quarter credit hours
  • Program Length: 4 years
  • Format: Online

Admission Requirements

  • GPA: 2.0 minimum
  • Standardized Tests: ACT, SAT, or ACCUPLACER

Contact the School


Minors

Grad School Preparation

The Biology program prepares students for graduate and professional programs including pre-medical and other health professions, organismal and field biology. Graduates of our program have succeeded in a wide range of professional and graduate programs.

Research Opportunities

The Biology department offers our students research opportunities in Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Wildlife, and Field Biology.

Individual Attention

We are dedicated to personalized attention for every student. Our majors’ classes and lab maintain a class size from 10 – 40 students per class, allowing faculty and students to interact directly.


Neuroscience, BS/Biology, Accelerated MS

Overview

This bachelor's/accelerated master's degree program allows academically strong undergraduates with a commitment to advance their education to obtain both the Neuroscience, BS and the Biology, MS degrees within an accelerated timeframe. Upon completion of this 138 credit accelerated program, students will be exceptionally well prepared for entry into their careers or into a doctoral program in the field or in a related discipline.

Students are eligible to apply for this accelerated program once they have earned at least 60 undergraduate credits and can enroll in up to 18 credits of graduate coursework after successfully completing 75 undergraduate credits. This flexibility makes it possible for students to complete a bachelor's and a master's in five years.

For more detailed information, see AP.6.7 Bachelor's/Accelerated Master's Degrees. For policies governing all graduate degrees, see AP.6 Graduate Policies. For more information on undergraduates enrolling in graduate courses, see AP.1.4.4 Graduate Course Enrollment by Undergraduates.

Application Requirements

Applicants to all graduate programs at George Mason University must meet the admission standards and application requirements for graduate study as specified in the Graduate Admission Policies section of this catalog.

Important application information and processes for this accelerated master's program can be found here.

Students should seek out the graduate program's advisor who will aid in choosing the appropriate graduate courses and help prepare the student for graduate studies.

GRE scores are not required for students in this accelerated program.

Students must obtain a graduate faculty advisor prior to beginning graduate coursework.

Successful applicants will have an overall undergraduate GPA of at least 3.10. Three letters of recommendation, including one from a prospective thesis or project advisor, are required. Additionally, they will have completed 2 the following courses with a GPA of 3.00 1 or higher:

Grades of 2.50 in CHEM 313 Organic Chemistry I and CHEM 315 Organic Chemistry Lab I are acceptable for admission into this accelerated pathway.

Registration in, as opposed to completion of, NEUR 327 Cellular, Neurophysiological, and Pharmacological Neuroscience is sufficient.

Accelerated Option Requirements

After the completion of 75 undergraduate credits, students may complete 3 to 12 credits of graduate coursework that can apply to both the undergraduate and graduate degrees.

In addition to applying to graduate from the undergraduate program, students in the accelerated program must submit a bachelor's/accelerated master's transition form (available from the Office of the University Registrar) to the College of Science's Office of Academic and Student Affairs by the last day to add classes of their final undergraduate semester. Students should enroll for courses in the master's program in the fall or spring semester immediately following conferral of the bachelor's degree, but should contact an advisor if they would like to defer up to one semester.

Students must maintain an overall GPA of 3.00 or higher in all graduate coursework and should consult with their faculty advisor to coordinate their academic goals.

Reserve Graduate Credit

Accelerated master's students may also take up to 6 graduate credits as reserve graduate credits. These credits do not apply to the undergraduate degree, but will reduce the master's degree by up to 6 credits. With 12 graduate credits counted toward the undergraduate degree plus the maximum 6 reserve graduate credits, the credits necessary for the graduate degree can be reduced by up to 18.

Graduate Course Suggestions

The following list of suggested courses is provided for general reference. To ensure an efficient route to graduation and post-graduation readiness, students are strongly encouraged to meet with an advisor before registering for graduate-level courses.